I had the Best Possible Experience in Every Way | Minnesota

We often receive the feedback and testimonials from our cosmetic patients. This is one of them we received yesterday. We are proud that we provided high quality cosmetic care.

“I believe that I had the best possible experience in every way from the initial consultation, the procedure, the preparation, and after visits.

When I came for the consultation it had taken a year to get the courage to do so, and I wasn’t set on any decision, but Dr. Shu was very kind, engaging, and explained simply what he recommended, and why.

Emily was very pleasant, kind, reassuring: the preparation was explained and all the instructions well written.

The procedure itself was very impressive, and interesting. It was then when I realized all that was involved, and all the skill involved to do this!

It was then also I probably realized the discount he so kindly gave me especially when I got off the table and saw all the equipment used on me! Wow! And also how personable both Dr. Shu and Emily were, and the sense of humor! And Emily also writing down the name of the classical music we listened to by Yo-Yo Ma, so I could purchase on i-tunes~ Such warmth and kindness all around, which I’ll always remember and appreciate”. – Dan H

For more testimonials, please click “Testimonials“.

Dr. Shu Performs Liposuction on Himself (DIY Liposuction) | Minnsota

In an ambitious feat, Dr. Shu performed a liposuction procedure on himself on April 30th. Dr. Shu took the role of both the patient and the surgeon, removing his own fat from his abdomen without the assistance of nurses or another surgeon.

One reason he performed this procedure was simply to remove excess pockets of fat from his abdomen. However, the main purpose of performing a liposuction on himself was, first and foremost, to experience the liposuction procedure from the patient’s perspective. In doing so, Dr. Shu gained a better understanding of what a patient undergoing liposuction may experience, allowing him to provide better care for his patients. This is not the first time Dr. Shu has performed one of his procedures on himself. In the past, he has also performed a gastroscopy (EGD) on himself – one in 2006.

Dr. Shu always wants to be a surgeon who truly understands his patients needs.

Dr. Shu Led the Chinese American Physicians and Established the International Volunteering Physician Organization – Medical Volunteers International (MVI)

Medical Volunteers International (MVI) is a volunteer organization initiated and created by Chinese physicians in the United States. It is non-profit, non-religious, and non-affiliated to any political group. It is for all Chinese physicians and other physicians of other ethnicities in the world to join, collectively promote, and develop international medical volunteering.

Dr. Shu is the founder of Medical Volunteers International (MVI), and he is currently serving as MVI President.

MVI’s aim is to provide Chinese physicians and physicians of other ethnicities with useful information about international medical volunteering, and to build a platform for volunteers exchanging and sharing personal experiences. Through connection and communication with other international medical volunteer organizations, MVI will help their members find suitable volunteer projects. Meanwhile MVI will actively create and initiate its own projects in Haiti, Cambodia and Senegal beginning in 2018. These projects will focus on helping areas in urgent need of medical resources and supplies, as well as patients in need of necessary medical treatments.

In 2014, Dr.Steven Shu joined the “No-Scalpel Vasectomy International, Inc”, an international medical volunteer organization led by Dr. Doug Stein. Dr.Shu made a total of four trips to the Philippines and Haiti in the past two years.

Dr. Shu’s personal experience led him to a larger vision, driven by a sense of individual responsibility and ideology. He realized that an individual’s strength is often limited. However, if individuals come together to build an organization, this organization’s power will be unlimited. There are more than 6,000 Chinese physicians in the United States, hundreds of thousands around the world, and much more in Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong.

With the power of social media and social networking, overseas Chinese physicians should be able to set up an organization, such as MVI, to connect with people around the world to help those in need of medical aid. Through communicating with other Chinese physicians, Dr.Shu learned that many physicians share similar interests and goals, and are willing to be involved in medical volunteering, but most of them do not know how or where to start. He also learned that some physicians in North America are already at the forefront of such endeavors, the most prominent being Dr. Jun Xu. Dr. Xu has visited Senegalese, Africa for medical mission trips every year since 2013, and Dr. Junkui Zhang and Dr. Tiebo Fu have participated in medical volunteer activities in Central America. Therefore, at the end of 2016, after careful and thorough consideration, Dr.Shu decided that the time for advocating overseas Chinese physicians to establish an international medical volunteer platform has come.

After discussion with Dr. Jun Xu and other physicians who showed great enthusiasm and support, a council of nine members was formed. On January 29, 2017, MVI was established and started to recruit new members immediately. In the meantime, fund-raising efforts have begun.

MVI was incorporated on February 8, 2017. By April 30, 2017, a total of 99 people joined the MVI with 64 official physician members. IRS approved the MVI’s 501 C3 tax exempt status in the March, 2017.

40% of Patients with General Anesthesia Experience ‘Brain Fog’ or POCD | Minnesota

The best way to avoid “brain fog” or postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) related to general anesthesia is not to use it at all.

Surgery patients are routinely exposed to up to 30% more anesthetic drugs than needed in a study published by board-certified anesthesiologist, Dr. Barry Friedberg.

40M patients undergo anesthesia every year for major surgery. 40% of them (16M) experience ‘brain fog’ or postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), likely from too much anesthesia. That 16 million patients every year have underlying, previously undiagnosed preoperative conditions is an untenable assertion, yet that is the “standard” response when anesthesia providers are asked if their or their loved one’s postop mental dysfunction could be from too much anesthesia.

“The bottom line,” says Friedberg, “Don’t let your parents, your spouse or anybody you love, especially over 50, get general anesthesia without a brain monitor or you may NEVER speak to that person again. The mind you save could be theirs, or even your own!”

“Although the brain monitor helps to ‘control’ their individual anesthetic dose and avoid over medication, the best way to avoid ‘brain fog’ or postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) related to general anesthesia is not to use it at all,” says Dr. Steven Shu.

Dr. Shu performs all cosmetic surgeries under local tumescent anesthesia with IV sedation only, which does not cause “brain fog” or postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD).



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